IN THE BLINK OF AN EYE

One half of Electric Egg -  Steven Hatton

One half of Electric Egg –
Steven Hatton

During the first few sessions of the BFI course at Lincoln University, as a group we were lucky enough to be taught by the video production, photography and animation company; Electric Egg. This consisted of Neil Baker and Steven Hatton and amongst the vast knowledge they handed over to us to feed off concerning the origins of cinema, the manipulation of film reel, how to “read” a piece of filmmaking and much more, a book was mentioned to us as valuable learning material. It was stressed that us students got our hands on it and as days passed I began to hear more and more about this book, such as from my Media Studies teacher who also recommended it to me.

In The Blink Of An Eye

My copy of Murch’s masterful “perspective on film editing”.

The book is “In The Blink Of An Eye” by Walter Murch, which serves as a “perspective on film editing”. Editing is a huge part of making a film. The “puzzle”, which is a word Murch uses to describe the process of piecing together a movie in post-production, can make or break a piece. It can create and stimulate effects whilst being capable of r undermining or destroying others and so the editor, or the editors in some cases, play a vital role in the creation of a film, or any form of moving image for that matter.

Murch’s book works to my advantage through the “wealth of first-hand knowledge” it communicates and every page thrives with information from an experienced, talented and intelligent film editor. Early in the book I realised the significance, the freedom and the true, inevitable effect editing has on the audience. It is not an element of filmmaking to be over-looked and should be taken very seriously and executed with much care and thought.

As Fred Zinneman describes in the book, Murch’s piece acts as “wealth of first-hand knowledge about the mysteries of giving birth to a film”. As a “perspective on editing”, it truly helped me identify the psychological reasoning behind a cut and the vast possibilities a sequence of clips can have if edited together differently. It has significantly influenced me by giving me a deeper understanding of how editing works and the priorities a film should have. Murch’s “Rule Of Six” puts “emotion” at the very top of a filmmaker’s priorities, and this idea is something that has significantly influenced my filmmaking for the better. The second half of the book discusses the change to digital editing that has occurred over the last decade and details Murch’s experience with Final Cut. This serves me nicely since Final Cut Pro is the editing system Jannath and I will be using to assemble our film, Screen Three,

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